National Gallery (England)

National Gallery (England)

National Gallery, founded in London in 1824, has a collection of more than 2,300 pieces. The building is located in Trafalgar Square. The museum has many paintings in the thirteenth century during the twentieth century. The collection is owned by the people of the United Kingdom and is free to enter.

The beginning of the National Gallery was very modest. Unlike the Paris Louvre in Paris and the Prado Museum in Madrid, it is not based on an existing royal or private collection. In 1824, the British government bought 36 paintings from banker John Julius Angerstein. These tables were the first works of the museum. That time manager Sir Charles Lock Eastlake’s efforts and the donations made constitute two-thirds of the collection of the museum. [2] As a result, despite having a small-size collection compared to other national galleries in Europe, it was noted for its ability to capture important pieces and to include a wide range of Giotto’s from C├ęzanne. One period was one of several galleries that could display their permanent collection in Europe. [3]

The building is on the north shore of Trafalgar Square. The front side was the architect William Wilkins and it has been the same since the day it was built. The Sainsbury Wing was expanded by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown. These extensions are important examples of postmodern architecture. The current manager of the museum is Nicholas Penny.